How We Learn is Constantly Changing

Every single day technology becomes more and more prevalent in our society. This means that education too is becoming technologically driven. As we advance with our tools of technology and social media, schools must keep up and grow with the changes. This growth means that how we look at education, and how students themselves learn is different. Technology and social media now allow us to connect to billions of people all over the world within seconds. This means that our students can be more informed about the world around them, and connect more easily to the issues and dilemmas that our society faces. We can use this to benefit our students’ education and knowledge of social justice and their role in it. By educating and giving our students to take on a role and find greater meaning in their community and society, their understanding of social justice only broadens.

Image There are so many great ways through technology to get involved in good causes and become a part of a network of people who are all striving for change in their own community. Whether it is helping someone online with a tutorial, or spreading news information to inform those around us, technology connects us all and makes making a difference that much more possible. However, it is also important in this technological era that we do still emphasize the importance of connecting in person, and communicating with one another face to face. If we remember to balance the ways in which we communicate and connect, then we truly flourish.

 

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “How We Learn is Constantly Changing

  1. Of course technology is a great tool to help us connect with others, but how can we use technology in a classroom including students who do not have constant access to cell phones and computers? We should use social media to allow students to connect, but we need to be careful not to leave anyone out.

    • Yes we absolutely need to ensure that we give our students equal opportunity to utilize technology in our classrooms! Unfortunately it is a little tricky to ensure that all students have the same access to technology outside of the classroom due to social circumstances beyond our control as teachers. I think it is about finding means and tools that everyone can use and enjoy as learning tools. What are some of the ways you think teachers could combat this issue?

  2. I agree that technology is an effective tool in the classroom and has great benefits to shape lessons and better understand the world. But I feel we cant solo rely on technology as the ‘set’ or ‘hook’ to our lessons. I feel as teachers we should be able to share a connection with our students without having to turn to a screen or a click of a button.

    • You make a great point! Our jobs can not be replaced by machines because we do indeed need to maintain that connection with our students. Technology is a great support, but we need to be the fundamental part of our students’ education. Overuse of technology can be a very negative experience, we need to use it responsibly and only when it benefits our lesson plans and students.

  3. I like how you pointed out all the good uses of technology (tutorial, references) but most importantly I like how you also stated that it is still important to learn to connect on a social level as well and balance out technology and in person communication. I find with technology growing in our society it is extremely important to not fall under the way of only using technology to speak to one another.

    • Exactly Paige! Our human connection is a very powerful thing and we need to maintain and emphasize this form of communication. We learn so much from each other, and we cannot waste that resource. Do you feel that communication person to person in the class is not utilized as much as it should?

  4. I love the optimism in your post! I think there are so many great things that technology does for us. I’ll pose this question though: (Mike would love this) if these are the things that technology makes possible for us, what kinds of things does it make IMpossible for us? Jokes and cheesy lingo aside, I think it’s an important thing to consider. My sense has always been that technology can alienate and confuse as much as it can connect and inform. I believe that critical thinking and empathy become even more crucial to our curriculum when we start using technology. Students need to consider all aspect of digital communication with careful lens and a fine-toothed comb. They need to be asking: “Who wrote this?” “Why did they write it?” “How is this going to make people feel?” “Is this necessary?” “What do I think about this?” Without those questions in their minds, students might slip into a complacency with what they find on the internet or how technology is used, and fail to challenge and improve the system. What do you think?

    • I think you make some very great points here! I don’t feel that we should teach our students to worship the internet or let it control or influence their life decisions without being critical. Sometimes we as teachers can get excited at the prospect of new teaching tools and resources, that sometimes we ourselves forget to truly reflect on the hindrances of it as well. As we discussed in class, it is all about balance in education. If we can teach our students to appreciate the positive aspects of the internet, as well as be critical of the negative aspects, than I believe we are enabling them to get the most out of the internet.

  5. I really like your comments! I think you made some excellent points. I especially liked the idea that you had mentioned to balance technological interactions with social interactions. Do you think finding that balance would be hard as a teacher?

    • Thanks Breann, I think if we create our lesson plans with this balance and our students’ needs in mind, then we can achieve this technological and interpersonal balance. We should in no way rely on technology for our classrooms, but instead use it as an educational asset. Do you think the balance will be a challenge in your classroom?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s